Ellika Schalling

Professor at Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Speech-Language Pathology

Email:
ellika.schalling[AT-sign]neuro.uu.se
Telephone:
+4618-471 4644
Mobile phone:
+46 73 4697217
Visiting address:
BMC, Husargatan 3, Uppsala
Postal address:
Box 564
751 22 UPPSALA

Short presentation

Since September 2021 Professor in speech-language pathology at Uppsala University with a joint position as speech-language pathologist at Uppsala University Hospital. My research and teaching is focused on communication disorders in people with acquired brain damage or neurological disease. Methods for assessment and intervention are developed and evaluated in different projects and symptom profiles and changes after intervention are studied in relation to results from neuroimaging.

Bachelor in Speech-language pathology from Karolinska Institutet in1986 and Master of Science in Speech-language pathology from Boston University in 1992. Doctoral degree from Karolinska Institutet in 2007 with a thesis entitled: Speech, Voice, Language and Cognition in Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). Associate professor (“docent”) at Karolinska Institutet 2018. Professor in Speech-language pathology at Uppsala University from September 1st 2021.

Research focuses on speech, voice, and language in individuals with neurological injury or disease. Symptom profiles are characterized and related to findings from neuroimaging studies. Assessment methods, also including assessment of communicative participation are developed and effects of speech-language pathology intervention are studied. A new group intervention (HiCommunication) developed for people with Parkinson’s disease and speech- and communication difficulties is evaluated. In a different project, effects of an intervention program for intensive rehabilitation of acquired language disorders (aphasia) is studied. Implementation of intensive aphasia rehabilitation according to national guidelines for care following stroke by the National Board of Health and Welfare (Socialstyrelsen) is also studied. Voice use in everyday life, and to what extent data from speech recordings in a controlled studio environment correspond to data from situations in everyday life as well as effects of biofeedback on voice intensity is studied with a portable voice accumulator in people with Parkinson’s disease.

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Ellika Schalling