Kristoffer Jutvik

doctoral/PhD student at Institute for Housing and Urban Research

Email:
kristoffer.jutvik[AT-sign]ibf.uu.se
Telephone:
+4618-471 6539
Visiting address:
Trädgårdsgatan 18
Postal address:
Box 514
751 20 UPPSALA

doctoral/PhD student at Department of Government, Graduate Students

Email:
kristoffer.jutvik[AT-sign]ibf.uu.se
Telephone:
+4618-471 1203
Visiting address:
Gamla Torget 6
Postal address:
Box 514
751 20 UPPSALA

Short presentation

PhD student in political science at the Institute for Housing and Urban Research and the Department of Government who focuses on local differences in migration- and integration policy and the effect of migration policy on migration flows and labor market participation.

Keywords: urban studies migration refugees migration law policyanalys policy reform

Also available at

My courses

Biography

Hello,

My name is Kristoffer Jutvik and I´m a PhD student at the Institute for Housing and Urban Research and the Department of Government. During autumn 2019 and spring 2020 I’m a guest researcher at the Institute for research on migration, ethnicity and society (REMESO) in Norrköping.

My main research interests revolve around multicultural politics, the multicultural society, integration, and migration.

My dissertation focuses on the emergence and effect of migration policies in Sweden. The dissertation consists of four articles. In the first two articles I try to understand inter-municipal variations in refugee reception policies among municipalities in Sweden by adopting both qualitative and quantitative methods.

In the two other articles, I focus on the effect of a policy change that was implemented in September 2013 in Sweden. Shortly, the policy change meant that asylum seekers from Syria were granted permanent- instead of temporary residence permits. In the first article, that I write together with Henrik Andersson (Department of Government, Uppsala University), we investigate the effect of the policy change on the number of asylum seekers coming to Sweden and how the change of policy affected the distribution of Syrian asylum seekers in Europe. In the second article, that I write together with Darrel Robinson (Political Department, Uppsala University), we investigate the effect of temporary- and permanent residence permits on participation in education and the labour market.

The abstracts of the articles are found below (under research).

Research

Do asylum seekers respond to policy changes? Evidence from the Swedish-Syrian case (with Henrik Andersson) - This paper uses quasi-experimental evidence to understand how changes in migration policy affect the number of asylum seekers. We look specifically at a regulatory, sudden change in the Swedish reception of Syrian asylum seekers. The change took place in September 2013, and implied that all Syrian asylum seekers would be granted permanent, instead of temporary resident permits. Using high frequency data and an interrupted time series set-up, we study to what extent this change caused more Syrian citizens to apply for asylum in Sweden, and how the change affected the distribution of asylum seekers in Europe. Results show that the change in policy almost doubled the number of asylum seekers from Syria within 2013, with a significant jump in numbers already within the first week after the implementation of the policy. While this also decreased the share of asylum seekers to other large recipient countries (Germany), the effects were highly temporary.

Peripheral Narratives about Local Reception of Refugees in Sweden - Reasoning and Motivations from Municipal Perspectives - The large variation in refugee reception rates between European nation states has spurred debate about "responsibility-sharing" in matters of migration. More recently, however, scholars have noted that the variations in refugee reception occur not only between nation states but also within them at the local level. This study concentrates on four small-sized municipalities in Sweden with 7,500 to 50,000 inhabitants, and with historically divergent approaches to refugee reception. By performing semi-structured interviews with local politicians and bureaucrats, the study aims to contribute new insights into how these actors perceive and explain local refugee reception within this specific type of municipality, which has not commonly been focused on in existing studies. This study concludes that there are shared understandings about how refugee reception has been performed locally in the included municipalities. Moreover, the absence (or presence) of prior refugee reception seem to have influenced perceptions about institutional capacities and resource availability connected to refugee settlement. In explaining the municipal approach, the narratives consistently point to the importance of experience in the area of refugee settlement compared to party representation in the local assembly or resource availability. These results highlight the complexities connected to local refugee reception and how disparities in historical reception rates may affect (perceived) abilities to host newcomers. Such perceptions might, of course, be important to consider in the implementation of a system of equal distribution.

Unity or Distinction over Political Borders? The Impact of Mainstream Parties in Local Seat Majorities on Refugee Reception - This study investigates how mainstream political coalitions affect local refugee reception policy. More specifically, this study exploits close elections in Sweden in order to assess the impact of local seat majorities on municipal refugee intake. Focusing on the main centre-right and a centre-left political blocs, the study aims to bring new insights about the willingness to receive refugees during three waves of elections in municipalities were mainstream parties obtained seat majorities. This article brings a few additions to current research. Firstly, it focuses on the effect of mainstream political alliances on reception policy which is a largely unexplored area in previous research. Secondly, it exploits close elections to estimate the causal effect of local seat majorities. Lastly, it focuses on refugee reception policy implemented at the local level within one national context rather than comparing different institutional contexts. In conclusions, this study argues that the relationship between the mainstream political blocs and refugee immigration policy is of associative nature. In order to find an effect of seat majorities, the win margin for each bloc needs to be substantial. These results indicate that there is a coherent political attitude over the mainstream parties towards refugee reception and that other factors, and not political majorities, have contributed to the uneven distribution of refugees among municipalities in Sweden.

Limited Time or Secure Residence? A Study on the Short-Term Effects of Temporary and Permanent Residence Permits on Labour Market Participation (with Darrel Robinson) - In this study we exploit a sudden policy change implemented in Sweden in order to evaluate the effects of permanent residency on labour market participation. In short, the policy change implied that Syrians were granted permanent instead of temporary residency as before the new regulations. Using detailed Swedish registry data, we examine the effect of the introduction of permanent residency on three measures of labour market inclusion in the short-term. We analyze the data through a simple difference-in-means as well as through comparison to groups unaffected by the policy in a difference-in-differences design and a synthetic control group approach. Our conclusions are twofold. On the one hand, we conclude that temporary residents that are subject to a relatively less-inclusive situation earn more and are unemployed less. However, at the same time, they are less likely to spend time in education than are those with permanent residency.

Publications

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