Organisation and staff

Kristoffer Jutvik

doctoral/PhD student at Institute for Housing and Urban Research

Email:
kristoffer.jutvik[AT-sign]ibf.uu.se
Telephone:
+4618-471 6539
Visiting address:
Trädgårdsgatan 18
Postal address:
Box 514
751 20 UPPSALA

doctoral/PhD student at Department of Government, Graduate Students

Email:
kristoffer.jutvik[AT-sign]ibf.uu.se
Telephone:
+4618-471 1203
Visiting address:
Gamla Torget 6
Postal address:
Box 514
751 20 UPPSALA

Short presentation

PhD student in political science at the Institute for Housing and Urban Research and the Department of Government who focuses on local differences in migration- and integration policy and the effect of migration policy on migration flows and labor market participation.

Also available at

My courses

Biography

Hi,

My name is Kristoffer Jutvik and I´m a PhD student at the Institute for Housing and Urban Research and the Department of Government. I received my bachelor’s degree from Linnaeus University in Kalmar and I later moved to Uppsala to attend the Master program in political science. After I graduated in 2013, I worked at the Swedish Migration Board before I started the PhD program in January 2015.

My main interests of research revolve around multicultural politics, the multicultural society, integration, and migration.

My dissertation focuses on migration- and integration policies in Sweden. The dissertation consists of four articles in total. In the first two articles, which have an explanatory approach, I try to understand why municipalities in Sweden developed different approaches to migration over time. The first article focuses on the impact of seat majorities in local councils on migrant reception. Focusing on the main political blocs, the study aims to bring new insights about the role of mainstream parties in shaping local migration policy. The second article, which has a qualitative approach, aims to bring new insights about how politicians and bureaucrats in municipalities with diverging historical migrant reception look upon causes of refugee reception and prospects for refugee reception.

The second part of the thesis focuses on the effects of different types of migration policies. In this part, which consists of two co-authored articles, I focus on the effect of a policy change that was implemented in September 2013. Shortly, the policy change meant that asylum seekers from Syria were granted permanent- instead of temporary residence permits. In the first article, that I write together with Henrik Andersson (Institute of Housing and Urban Research, Uppsala University), we investigate the effect of the policy change on the number of asylum seekers coming to Sweden and how the change affected the distribution of Syrian asylum seekers in Europe. In the second article, that I write together with Darrel Robinson (Political Department, Uppsala University), we investigate the effect of temporary- and permanent residence permits on labor market participation.

The abstracts of the articles are found below (under research).

Research

Political Alliances and Migration Policy in Sweden: The Impact of Seat Majorities in Local Councils on Migrant Reception - The varying nature of policies concerning migration and integration has caught the interest of a growing number of scholars. Previous research has produced mixed results concerning the impact of differential sets of explanatory institutional and/or contextual factors. This study focuses on the impact of seat majorities in local councils on migration policy output in Sweden. Focusing on the main political blocs, the study aims to bring new insights about the role of mainstream parties in shaping local migration policy during three waves of elections. This study adds to current research in three important ways. Firstly, it focuses on policy implemented at the local level within one national context rather than comparing different institutional contexts. Secondly, it focuses on the impact of mainstream political alliances on policy which is a largely unexplored area in previous research. Lastly, it attempts to address the problem of omitted variable bias by utilizing regression discontinuity design. In conclusion, this study does not find a causal pathway between the migrant reception and political seat majorities. These results indicate that there is a coherent political attitude towards migrant reception over the mainstream political blocs and that other factors, and not political majorities, promote the variance in migrant reception at the local level in Sweden.

Path dependencies in local migration policy in Sweden: Causes and prospects to reception of refugees from municipal perspectives - This study concentrates on four municipalities in Sweden with diverging historical reception of migrants. By performing semi-structured interviews with local politicians and bureaucrats in small- and medium-sized municipalities, the study aims to bring new insights about how these actors look upon causes of refugee reception and prospects for refugee reception. In conclusion, the study suggests that prior experiences with migration are central determinants to explain contemporary refugee reception in the type of municipalities under scrutiny here. As these communities lack a natural inflow of migrants, commonly found in more metropolitan areas, prior experiences with migration have facilitated (or hindered) the incorporation of migrant reception into the municipal identity despite ideological agendas and local capacities, two explanations highlighted in previous studies. In that sense, not only nation-states are marked by institutional continuances, but also local entities. These results indicate that local path dependencies have played an important role even if other prominent hypotheses are taken into account. The conclusions in this study highlight the complexity of local migrant reception and how differences in historical reception may hinder or promote willingness to receive migrants within the same nation.

Do asylum seekers respond to policy changes? Evidence from the Swedish-Syrian case (with Henrik Andersson) - This paper uses quasi-experimental evidence to understand how changes in migration policy affect the number of asylum seekers. We look specifically at a regulatory, sudden change in the Swedish reception of Syrian asylum seekers. The change took place in September 2013, and implied that all Syrian asylum seekers would be granted permanent, instead of temporary resident permits. Using high frequency data and an interrupted time series set-up, we study to what extent this change caused more Syrian citizens to apply for asylum in Sweden, and how the change affected the distribution of asylum seekers in Europe. Results show that the change in policy almost doubled the number of asylum seekers from Syria within 2013, with a significant jump in numbers already within the first week after the implementation of the policy. While this also decreased the share of asylum seekers to other large recipient countries (Germany), the effects were highly temporary.

Publications

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