Organisation and staff

Benjamin Martin

researcher at Department of History of Science and Ideas

Email:
benjamin.martin[AT-sign]idehist.uu.se
Mobile phone:
+46 70 4250656
Visiting address:
Engelska parken, Thunbergsv 3P
Postal address:
Box 629
751 26 UPPSALA

Short presentation

An American-born and trained historian of twentieth-century Europe, I work as researcher in Uppsala's Department of History of Science and Ideas since February 2017. My book, The Nazi-Fascist New Order for European Culture, was published by Harvard in 2016.

My current research, financed by the Swedish Foundation for Humanities and Social Sciences, explores how European states' cultural treaties helped create a global concept of culture in the twentieth century.

See also: benjamingmartin.com

Also available at

My courses

Biography

A graduate of Columbia University (PhD, 2006), Benjamin Martin is a cultural historian of twentieth-century Europe, with a particular focus on interwar Germany and Italy. He is the author of The Nazi-Fascist New Order for European Culture (Harvard University Press, 2016), a study of how the German-Italian Axis sought to create a "New Order" in European cultural life in the late 1930s and during WWII. He has published on related topics in the Journal of Contemporary History and, most recently, in an edited volume on Swedish intellectual and cultural leaders' cooperation with Nazi Germany.

At Uppsala Univeristy, Martin works as researcher in the Department of History of Science and Ideas, where he also teaches several courses in intellectual and cultural history, including co-teaching a course on narrative and the uses of history. His current research, financed by the Swedish Foundation for Humanities and Social Sciences, uses the cultural treaties entered into by the major European powers as a historical source with which to explore the emergence of a global concept of culture in the twentieth century.

From 2010 to early 2017 he was director of the Euroculture Program, an Erasmus Mundus MA program in European studies. Along with two former Euroculture colleagues, Martin co-directs the U4 research network "Cultural Mechanisms of Inclusion and Exclusion in Contemporary Europe" (CMIECE).

Interested in the emerging field of the environmental humanities, Martin led the planning of Euroculture’s 2014 summer Intensive Program, which linked European studies to the environmental humanities through a week-long program on “How a New Climate is Changing the Old World.” Martin is likewise involved in the new undergraduate Liberal Arts Program at Uppsala’s Campus Gotland, where he helped develop (and co-taught) the course "Människan och miljön" ("Humans and the environment").

Martin has presented on culture and politics in non-academic contexts, including presentations on Italian futurism at SFMOMA, on fascism and intellectuals at the Bard Music Festival, and in historical presentations for the cast and crew of Uppsala Stadsteater's productions of Sound of Music (2012) and Cabaret (2014), for which he also wrote program notes.

Previously Martin served on the research staff of KUSKO, an inter-departmental research group at Uppsala that pursued philosophical and historical studies of “knowledge societies,” focusing on the international organization and communication of knowledge. Between 2011 and 2014 he taught several courses for the Department of History, including an MA-level course on historical theory and methods (for the Roads to Democracy Program and, in 2014, for the MA program in Global Environmental History), as well as lectures and seminars for the undergraduate-level Historikerprogrammet. He has also supervised several masters theses.

Prior to coming to Uppsala, Martin was Assistant Professor of History at San Francisco State University from 2008 to 2010, where he taught on the political and cultural history of twentieth-century Europe.

Please visit also www.benjamingmartin.com. Some publications and papers are available at Ben Martin’s page at academia.edu.

Research

My current research, financed by the Swedish Foundation for Humanities and Social Sciences, explores how European states' cultural treaties helped create a global concept of culture in the twentieth century.

For more on this and other ongoing projects please visit benjamingmartin.com

Publications

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